Justine Schofield in the motherInc Kitchen

Masterchef finalist Justine Schofield has created a selection of Liquorice-inspired recipes to tantalise tastebuds and introduce Batch 37, complete with its new retro-style packaging, to sweet tooths across Australia.

 

Liquorice parfait, with grapefruit and pistachio crumble

Makes 6 - 8 individuals

Cooking time: 20 minutes + freezing time

Ingredients:

1 cup pistachios

½ cup Darrell Lea liquorice

300ml cream

50g Darrell Lea liquorice, cut into small pieces

1 vanilla bean, split in half

1 drop of aniseed essence

2 eggs

1 egg yolk

2 tsp. glucose

60g caster sugar

2 tbs. Pernod

1 grapefruit, segmented

Method:

For the crumble, pulse the pistachios and liquorice in a food processor until desired texture. Reserve for later.

Gently heat the cream, liquorice, aniseed essence and vanilla bean in a saucepan until liquorice is soft. Remove vanilla bean and allow to cool slightly. Place cream mixture into a food processor and blend for 1 minute. Poor through a fine sieve and set aside.

To make the sabayon, add the eggs, glucose, caster sugar and Pernod into a large metal bowl. Place over a pot of gently simmering water. Do not whisk at this stage. Allow the egg mixture to reach 84°C. Or until the mixture looks like it is thickening.

Remove from the heat and whisk immediately with an electric mixer until pale and thick. A ribbon formation should be made in the mixture when a wooden spoon is used. Now fold half of this sabayon into the cooled liquorice cream. Once combined add the remaining sabayon and fold through until well combined. Pour into the individual moulds and place into the freezer until firm.

To serve, place moulds in some hot water briefly to loosen. Demould and garnish with grapefruit segments and the pistachio crumble.

 

Roasted Balmain bug tails with a fennel and liquorice sauce

Cooking time: 30 minutes

Serves 4

Ingredients:

8 raw bug tails

50g butter

1 lemon, zest and juice of half

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 tbs. vegetable oil

3 French shallots, finely sliced

1 small fennel bulb, finely chopped

3 sprigs tarragon

4 sticks Darrell Lea liquorice, roughly chopped

2 tbs. Pernod

50 ml white wine

100ml fish stock

300ml cream

Salt and pepper

Method:

For the sauce, heat the oil in a medium saucepan. Add the shallots and fennel and sweat off for 5 minutes until soft. Add the tarragon and liquorice and cook off for another 2 minutes. Add the Pernod and flambé until the liquor has burnt off. Now place the white wine in with the ingredients and reduce for 2 minutes. Finally add the fish stock and bring to the boil. Add the cream and simmer until thick and glossy. Pass the sauce through a fine sieve and put in a clean saucepan. Season well.

Pre heat the oven to 180°C.

To prepare the bug tails, carefully remove the head and the intestinal tract. Flip the tail over and with kitchen scissors cut the soft shell away from the underside. Place bug tails on a baking tray, belly side up. Scatter knobs of the butter, lemon zest and juice, garlic and salt and pepper. Cook in the oven for 5-­?6 minutes.

To serve, place two bugs on a plate and pour over a little of the liquorice sauce. I like to add a couple of braised fennel to finish the dish off.

 

Seared duck breast with olive and liquorice crumbs and port reduction

Cooking time: 45 minutes

Serves 4


Ingredients:

4 duck breast

1 tbs. caster sugar

2 tbs. red wine vinegar

¼ cup port

½ cup veal stock

¼ cup olive, deseeded

¼ cup Darrell Lea liquorice, cut into small pieces

Salt and pepper


Method:

On a microwave safe tray scatter liquorice and olives. On high heat cook for 30 seconds. Remove and toss. If they are not completely dried out, place back in the microwave for another 30 seconds. Carefully remove from the microwave (they will be very hot) and allow to cool. Place in a food processor and pulse until crumbs are formed. Keep in a dry container until ready to use.

Remove duck breast from fridge 30 minutes before cooking. Score and season the skin well with salt. In a large frying pan add the four duck breast. Place on a low heat, skin side down. Slowly increase the heat. This will ensure most of the fat renders from the duck. Cook on the skin side for 4-­?6 minutes until skin is golden is crispy. Turnover and cook for a further 3-­?4 minutes. Remove from the pan and allow to rest in a warm spot while making the sauce.

Drain most of the duck fat from the pan. Place back on the heat and add the sugar. Allow a caramel to form and add the red wine vinegar and port. Swirl in the pan allowing the sugar and port to reduce until thick and glossy. Finally add the stock and reduce for another 4 minutes or until a sauce consistency is achieved.

Slice the duck and serve with the sauce and the liquorice crumbs. I like to also serve this with cauliflower puree.

 

liquoriceA ‘happy accident’ inspires the launch of Batch 37.

Some say it was a moment of genius, others refer to it as a ‘happy accident’, but whatever the tale, the re-birth of iconic confectionery brand Darrell Lea’s soft-eating liquorice is the stuff of legends.

Darrell Lea’s new Batch 37* liquorice – so named because of its concise 37-day shelf life, making it the freshest liquorice on the market – is now available in Darrell Lea stores and distributors nationwide, offering a melt-in-the-mouth experience that is second to none.

Formerly known as Original Soft Eating Liquorice, Batch 37 was born by accident one night back in 1957 at the Darrell Lea factory. The recipe was not followed as it should and resulted in the softest liquorice the Lea family had ever produced.

Darrell Lea CEO, Stuart Smith, said the exact story of Batch 37 remains as enigma but the finished product is the benchmark for liquorice around the world.

“No one knows precisely what happened that night, but one thing is certain – Batch 37 is the freshest, most authentic, and best tasting liquorice on the market. Based on an original Lea family recipe, it’s something Darrell Lea has perfected over the years and it’s little wonder its popularity has spread beyond Australia to the USA, UK, Canada, South Africa and New Zealand,” Mr Smith said.

“Batch 37 is set to reignite the love affair many Australians have with liquorice – you’d be surprised at the extraordinary lengths some go to in order to get their fix!” Justine said. “I’d love people to also experience the joys of cooking with liquorice – it has such a distinctive and delicious flavour and texture and is a surprising, yet delightful addition to a whole range of dishes,” she added.

 

 

 

Liquorice
parfait,
with
grapefruit
and
pistachio
crumble
Makes
6-­?8
individuals
Cooking
time:
20
minutes
+
freezing
time
1
cup
pistachios
½
cup
Darrell
Lea
liquorice
300ml
cream
50g
Darrell
Lea
liquorice,
cut
into
small
pieces
1
vanilla
bean,
split
in
half
1
drop
of
aniseed
essence
2
eggs
1
egg
yolk
2
tsp.
glucose
60g
caster
sugar
2
tbs.
Pernod
1
grapefruit,
segmented
For
the
crumble,
pulse
the
pistachios
and
liquorice
in
a
food
processor
until
desired
texture.
Reserve
for
later.
Gently
heat
the
cream,
liquorice,
aniseed
essence
and
vanilla
bean
in
a
saucepan
until
liquorice
is
soft.
Remove
vanilla
bean
and
allow
to
cool
slightly.
Place
cream
mixture
into
a
food
processor
and
blend
for
1
minute.
Poor
through
a
fine
sieve
and
set
aside.
To
make
the
sabayon,
add
the
eggs,
glucose,
caster
sugar
and
Pernod
into
a
large
metal
bowl.
Place
over
a
pot
of
gently
simmering
water.
Do
not
whisk
at
this
stage.
Allow
the
egg
mixture
to
reach
84°C.
Or
until
the
mixture
looks
like
it
is
thickening.
Remove
from
the
heat
and
whisk
immediately
with
an
electric
mixer
until
pale
and
thick.
A
ribbon
formation
should
be
made
in
the
mixture
when
a
wooden
spoon
is
used.
Now
fold
half
of
this
sabayon
into
the
cooled
liquorice
cream.
Once
combined
add
the
remaining
sabayon
and
fold
through
until
well
combined.
Pour
into
the
individual
moulds
and
place
into
the
freezer
until
firm.
To
serve,
place
moulds
in
some
hot
water
briefly
to
loosen.
Demould
and
garnish
with
grapefruit
segments
and
the
pistachio
crumble.
 
Banner